Ecojustice

Tell Minister McKenna that dirty thermal coal has no place in the 21st Century

From Ecojustice:

Thermal coal is a 19th century fuel that has no place in 2019.

So why is a massive Canadian coal mine expansion on the table?

Thermal coal is the dirtiest form of the world’s dirtiest fossil fuel. It’s toxic for human health and disastrous for the climate.

Despite this, mining company Coalspur wants to expand its Vista thermal coal mine, located in Alberta, to double or even triple its current planned capacity to extract thermal coal. If this happens, up to 15 million tonnes of coal could be extracted every year for export to coal plants overseas.

To put this into context, the greenhouse gas emissions, from burning that amount of coal, would be equal to the total annual emissions from more than 7 million cars.

With the help of supporters like you, Ecojustice has confronted dirty coal projects in the past. Now, on behalf of the Keepers of the Water and the West Athabasca Watershed Bioregional Society, we’re calling on the Minister of Environment and Climate Change to show climate leadership by ordering an environmental assessment of the Vista mine expansion.

Pending approval of new oilsands mine cause for concern

Pembina Institute and Ecojustice react to Joint Review Panel recommendation to approve new oilsands mine

CALGARY – Environmental law group Ecojustice and the Pembina Institute are concerned about the potential climate impacts of the Teck Resources’ Frontier oilsands open pit mine, following the release of a Joint Review Panel report today that recommends its approval.

Despite finding that the mine would have significant adverse impacts on the environment – including the irreversible loss of 14,000 hectares of wetlands – the Panel concluded that those impacts are justified and that the project is in the public interest. Moreover, despite previous legal precedent, the Panel failed to recognize the adverse climate impacts or explain why the emissions impacts of this project are not significant.

Ontario Court of Appeal hands Doug Ford another “L” on climate change

Toronto, June 28, 2019 – In a judgement handed down today, the Ontario Court of Appeal confirmed the federal government has the power to step in when the province fails to effectively tackle climate change.

Following the release of the court’s decision, Ecojustice lawyer and climate program director Alan Andrews issued the following statement:

Statement: Bill C-69 passes in the House

Ottawa – When House of Commons passed the Senate’s proposed amendments to Bill C-69, the federal government took an important step toward making good on its once-in-a-generation commitment to repair Canada’s broken environmental laws, says Ecojustice. Bill C-69 introduces the new Impact Assessment Act (IAA)which provides greater transparency in the environmental assessment process and more clearly-defined criteria for whether a project is in the public interest.

STATEMENT: Premier Jason Kenney’s plan to kill Alberta’s carbon tax is short sighted

CALGARY, May 23, 2019 — Premier Jason Kenney tabled legislation yesterday to scrap Alberta’s carbon tax as of May 30. The legislation removes the consumer levy, as well as the tax on facilities producing less than 100,000 tonnes of carbon per year.

Barry Robinson, lawyer for Ecojustice, made the following statement:

Cabinet must reject NEB recommendation, shut door on Trans Mountain project: Ecojustice

VANCOUVER – The National Energy Board (NEB) recommended today that Cabinet approve the Trans Mountain pipeline project, following a review of the project’s marine shipping impacts. Ecojustice lawyer Dyna Tuytel issued the following statement in response:

“The Trans Mountain pipeline project poses an unacceptable risk to endangered orcas, communities, and the climate.

SCC decision on abandoned oil wells a victory for environment and public but problems remain, Ecojustice says

CALGARY – The Supreme Court of Canada ruled today that cleaning up abandoned oil and gas wells must come before the interests of creditors after a company has gone bankrupt. Ecojustice lawyer Barry Robinson issued the following statement in response:

“The Supreme Court of Canada has ruled that bankruptcy trustees must put the environment first. This is a win for the environment and good news for landowners and Albertans.

First Nations, environmental groups launch lawsuit to protect at-risk boreal caribou

CALGARY — Ecojustice lawyers, acting on behalf of the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation, Mikisew Cree First Nation, Alberta Wilderness Association and David Suzuki Foundation, have filed a lawsuit against the federal minister of environment and climate change for her failure to protect the critical habitat of five boreal caribou herds in northeastern Alberta.

Populations of boreal caribou, the species famously depicted on the tail-side of the Canadian quarter, are in decline across the country, largely due to widespread loss and fragmentation of their habitat.

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