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Alberta's War on Pine Forest Misguided and Destructive

Alberta Wilderness AssociationCanadian Parks and Wilderness Society

The Alberta government's all-out war on mountain pine beetle (MPB) will seriously harm our forests and wildlife, cost over $20 million of taxpayers' money, and is destined to fail. CPAWS and AWA are calling for a more rational approach to deal with MPB including preserving caribou habitat, investing in a value-added wood products industry, re-evaluating fire suppression strategies, and combating climate change.

"The pine beetles have invaded Alberta for one simple reason - the climate is now warm enough to support them," says Rick Schneider, Conservation Director with the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society. "We know from B.C.'s experience that stopping the beetle is impossible. The Canadian Forest Service has confirmed that intervention to bring the epidemic under control is not feasible. So instead of wasteful and destructive efforts to the stop the beetle we need to develop plans for living with it," says Schneider. Read more »

Posted November 15, 2006 by russ

Alberta Government's War - Threatened Caribou Are First Casualties

Alberta Wilderness AssociationCanadian Parks & Wilderness Society

November 10, 2006

The Alberta government has approved a policy that compels forestry companies to fight mountain pine beetle by clearcutting old pine forest in Alberta's Foothills. Alberta is forcing companies such as Weyerhaeuser in Grande Prairie to log mature pine forest that is at risk of mountain pine beetle attack. AWA and others believe the first casualty of Alberta's war on the forest will be threatened caribou populations. Read more »

Posted November 10, 2006 by russ

ENGOs Hope to Reverse the Destruction of Canada's Fisheries

Alberta Wilderness Association

October 12, 2006

Environmental non-government organizations and the Assembly of First Nations from sea to sea to sea gathered in Ottawa today for a historic meeting with senior Department of Fisheries and Oceans officials to discuss solutions to the crisis facing Canada's fish and fish habitats.

A good part of the meeting focused on the failure to enforce the strongest piece of Canadian environmental legislation, the federal Fisheries Act. Representatives of groups from across Canada expressed dismay at the continuing deterioration of fisheries and the associated regulatory regime. Read more »

Posted October 12, 2006 by russ

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