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Review of Enbridge oilsands pipeline doesn't stack up

29 Jun 2010

VANCOUVER, B.C. — When compared to the review of the Mackenzie Gas Project, the proposed environmental assessment of the Enbridge Gateway oilsands pipeline falls short, according to an analysis released today by the Pembina Institute.

The size of the Joint Review Panel and a lack of regional representation are two key concerns, said Karen Campbell, Staff Counsel for the Pembina Institute. Read more »

Posted June 29, 2010 by AEN

BP oil spill: Not an argument to ramp up oilsands production

The Pembina Institute's Simon Dyer lays out the case against the oilsands as a "green" alternative to offshore drilling.

It's been more than two months now that oil from BP's blown out Deepwater Horizon rig has been gushing into the Gulf of Mexico. A man-made disaster of epic proportions, some people are now claiming that it makes Alberta's landlocked oilsands look safe in comparison. In fact, that statement couldn't be further from the truth.

Posted June 28, 2010 by AEN

Guilty verdict in Syncrude case applauded

25 Jun 2010

CALGARY — Alberta provincial court’s guilty verdict in the Syncrude ducks case confirms the need to eliminate toxic tailings ponds and the risks they pose, Ecojustice said today. 

 

Some 1,600 ducks died after landing in a Syncrude tailings pond in April 2008. The pond’s bird deterrent systems were not in place at the time. Read more »

Posted June 28, 2010 by AEN

AEN members react to Syncrude duck death verdict

AEN members weighed in on Friday's guilty verdict in the Syncrude ducks case. Both Sierra Club Canada and Ecojustice applauded the verdict, suggesting that the verdict further confirms the need to eliminate the toxic tailings ponds. The Pembina Institute's Simon Dyer, while calling the verdict "significant" and "positive", raises questions about the deterrent value and impact of the verdict in the broader context of the oil sands tailings ponds:

Since the incident, the amount of tailings (the toxic liquid waste produced by the oil sands extraction process) has steadily increased in volume by 200 million litres, or 80 Olympic-sized swimming pools, every day to now cover an area of 170 km2. It raises the question: Did the ducks die in vain?

Posted June 28, 2010 by AEN

Sierra Club Canada applauds Syncrude court ruling

25 Jun 2010

OTTAWA – Syncrude Canada Ltd. was found guilty today on federal and provincial charges and may now face fines of up to $800 000.

“It is great to see Syncrude charged as guilty under federal and provincial laws," said Sheila Muxlow, Interim Director of Sierra Club Prairie. "I just hope the federal and provincial governments see that it's time to shut these projects down and begin the transition towards a clean, green, renewable energy economy." Read more »

Posted June 25, 2010 by AEN

Pembina reacts to proposed future federal coal regulations

23 Jun 2010

OTTAWA, ON — Marlo Raynolds, Executive Director of the Pembina Institute, made the following statement in response to today's announcement by Environment Minister Jim Prentice of future federal regulations for greenhouse gas emissions from coal-fired electricity:

“Minister Prentice’s commitment in principle to put an end to conventional coal-fired electricity is very welcome. A continued reliance on conventional coal would make achieving adequate greenhouse gas reductions in Canada virtually impossible.

Read more »

Posted June 23, 2010 by AEN

Tar Sands Giant Total stonewalls public inquiry into Tar Sands plans

15 Jun 2010

OTTAWA – One week after French tar sands giant Total blocked local residents from testifying at a tar sands upgrader hearing northeast of Edmonton, the corporation is now trying to limit what questions third party intervenors can ask with regards to their plans for a new tar sands mine.

Read more »

Posted June 15, 2010 by AEN

Are Greenpeace's stunts outrageous or essential?

The Alberta Environment Network consists of a wide variety of environmental non-governmental organizations — from large national organizations to small grassroots groups. AEN members employ a variety of tactics to achieve their environmental goals. Amongst the most controversial, are the direct action and civil disobedience tactics employed by Greenpeace in their oil sands campaign.

David Berry's piece in Alberta Views — The Disobedient Albertans — examines Greenpeace's tactics in Alberta, including the perspectives of a couple other AEN member groups.

Posted June 1, 2010 by AEN

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