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Boreal Market News Volume 3; Issue 5: May 16, 2005

Published by CPAWS - Edmonton Chapter (www.cpaws-edmonton.org)

1.  Joint initiative will take "Caribou Nation" to the Canadian public and international buyers of Canadian forest products; Alberta´s draft Caribou Recovery Plan criticized.
Today at a national meeting on the recovery of woodland caribou conservationists released a new educational report entitled Caribou Nation that documents the urgent situation facing this Canadian icon.  The report will be distributed not only throughout Canada, but also to international buyers of Canadian forest products, which have repeatedly exhibited concern for the welfare of Canada's forests and wildlife. A companion website can be found at www.caribounation.org <http://www.caribounation.org> .  Sierra Club Canada also recently released an evaluation of Alberta´s draft Caribou Recovery Plan concluding that it fails to adequately address key industrial threats facing caribou today.

2.  Conservationists release report on Kimberly-Clark and attend annual meeting calling for an end to destructive logging in the Canadian boreal.
Greenpeace released a business report entitled Kimberly-Clark, Investing in Forest Destruction: A Report on the World´s Largest Manufacturer of Tissue Products, Green Consumerism and Socially Responsible Investment. The report highlights tissue product manufacturer Kimberly-Clark´s controversial use of ancient forest fibre for its disposable products and points out its false claims of environmental responsibility.  Members of Greenpeace and the Natural Resources  Defense Council (NRDC) attended Kimberly-Clark´s annual meeting calling on the company to stop purchasing pulp from destructive logging operations in ancient forests, especially the Canadian boreal.

3.  Weyerhaeuser under increasing pressure to change.
Activists, customers and investors in simultaneous demonstrations at the New York Stock Exchange, Toronto Stock Exchange and Weyerhaeuser´s annual general meeting of shareholders in Washington called on the company to "wake up," modernize its outdated environmental policies – originally developed in 1971 – and publicly commit to protect endangered forests and respect native land rights.  They want Weyerhaeuser to join forest products companies like Tembec and Domtar, Inc. in working with environmental groups, impacted communities and independent scientists to implement comprehensive policies to protect endangered forests and their inhabitants.

4. Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society and Alberta scientists ask Klein to address the province´s environmental deficit.
Analysis of the new budget indicates the Alberta government is running an environmental deficit.  Expenditures were compared against results of the government´s recent It´s Your Future survey of Albertans.  Although Albertans ranked environment as their third priority, after health and education, government spending on the environment is extremely low. Environmental groups and scientists want Klein to put more money into environmental protection including establishment of protected areas, dealing meaningfully with the decline of woodland caribou, grizzly bears and fish in the province, improving forest management, and conserving our water resources.

See below for full text articles.  Past issues available at: www.cpaws-edmonton.org/Info/boreal_news.htm


Boreal Market News is a publication of the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society - Edmonton Chapter. Our intent is to provide information to decision makers on new developments in forest management, focusing on changing market forces.  For more information or to be added or removed from the mailing list contact the Editor, Helene Walsh, at: helene_w [at] telus [dot] net <mailto:helene_w [at] telus [dot] net>

1a. Conservationists Warn Situation Critical for Caribou Across Canada: Joint Initiative Will Take "Caribou Nation" to Thousands of Canadians

Press Release,  Sierra Club of Canada, ForestEthics, Western Canada Wilderness Committee,  April 28, 2005

Winnipeg, MN - Today at a national meeting on woodland caribou recovery ForestEthics, the Sierra Club of Canada and the Western Canada Wilderness Committee released a new educational report - "Caribou Nation" - documenting the urgent situation facing this Canadian icon. Caribou have been wiped out of PEI, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia, and populations are declining in every Canadian province. Scientists are warning that some southern herds could disappear in as little as ten years. Federal and provincial government efforts to recover caribou have thus far proven ineffective.

Today's report will be distributed not only throughout Canada, but also to international buyers of Canadian forest products, which have repeatedly exhibited concern for the welfare of Canada's forests and wildlife. A companion website can be found at www.caribounation.org <http://www.caribounation.org> .

"Caribou are a Canadian icon and they are vanishing before our eyes," said Candace Batycki of ForestEthics. "Will our children tell tales of the mythical caribou that once roamed our country, or will they learn the story of Canadians coming together to protect this gentle creature? Many northern cultures have relied on caribou for food, shelter and spiritual sustenance for thousands of years. But we're in danger of losing them if we don't get a handle on industrial development in caribou habitat."

"The Canadian Species at Risk Act has proven ineffective at protecting and recovering caribou," said Rachel Plotkin of the Sierra Club of Canada. "The feds are downloading responsibility onto the provinces. And the provinces aren't doing much better -- some provinces don't even have stand-alone endangered species legislation. Our leaders are fiddling while Rome burns."

"Government inaction is out of step with Canadian values," said Ron Thiessen of the Western Canada Wilderness Committee. "Poll after poll shows that Canadians want protection for species at risk. Here in Manitoba there is over 80% public support for protecting woodland caribou. Yet the Manitoba government has failed to live up to their promise to list and protect woodland caribou under our provincial Endangered Species Act. The province's Species Advisory Committee has repeatedly recommended this action for over a decade. What is the Manitoba government waiting for?"

 "We hope this week's conference will mark a shift in government and industry's approach to dealing with this problem," said Plotkin. "Caribou need strong laws that restrict industrial activities in caribou habitat, and provide for effective recovery actions. Our organizations, and many others, are joining forces to educate the public, marketplace and media about the problems facing caribou, and the solutions which need to be put in place to ensure this Canadian icon survives into the next century."

www.caribounation.org

Contacts:
Candace Batycki, ForestEthics, 604-219-7457
Rachel Plotkin, Sierra Club of Canada, 604-219-7457
Ron Thiessen, Wilderness Committee, 204-794-4971

1b.  Alberta Draft Recovery Plan a Green Stamp for Further Caribou Decline

Press Release, Sierra Club of Canada, April 19, 2005

Ottawa: Alberta stands poised to shirk its responsibility to take immediate action to protect woodland caribou, opting instead to protect industry while long-term plans are developed, says the Sierra Club of Canada. The Sierra Club today released an evaluation of Alberta's draft recovery plan for woodland caribou.

"The present draft recovery plan for Woodland Caribou in Alberta fails to adequately address key industrial threats facing caribou today," said Rachel Plotkin, National Forests and Biodiversity campaigner for the Sierra Club of Canada. "Some of these populations are circling the drain towards extinction, and unless actions are taken to halt logging and oil and gas activity in their habitat, their future is bleak" she added.

Industrial operations and the resulting degradation and fragmentation of forested habitat are a main factor in the decline of caribou across the country.  Sierra Club of Canada's evaluation was completed with the assistance of  Dr. James Schaefer, a caribou biologist, and Dr. Karen Beazley, a landscape ecologist. It concluded that the draft recovery plan proposes too little to challenge the momentum of ongoing industrial development in caribou habitat.

"These herds need protection now, but the draft recovery plan fails to deliver" said Rick Schneider, Executive Director of the Edmonton chapter of the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society. "The draft plan gives a green stamp to the current industrial activity that has led to the decimation of Alberta's caribou herds to continue."

The Plan recommends the creation of range teams to determine habitat targets for caribou populations in the future, and also recommends a moratorium on further industrial allocations in the habitat of the caribou herds that face immediate extirpation (local extinction). But under the plan, current industrial activity can continue unchecked.

Under SARA, recovery plans developed by the provinces must ultimately be approved by the Federal Minister of Environment. "It's our hope that the federal Minister will read these evaluations and take note," said Ms. Plotkin. "Industrial activities are chewing through forested habitat and leaving little room for caribou to live and recover. In order to ensure that there are caribou in Canada for future generations, recovery strategies need to have the teeth to bite back."

The evaluation of the Alberta Recovery Plan, and the full reviews by Dr. Beazely and Dr. Schaefer can be found on the Sierra Club of Canada's website: www.sierraclub.ca.

Contact
Ottawa: Rachel Plotkin (613) 241-4611 Director of Forests and Biodiversity, Sierra Club of Canada
Alberta: Rick Schneider (780) 662-4233 Canadian Parks and Wilderness
Society, Glen Semenchuck (780) 427-8124 Federation of Alberta Naturalists

2a.  Kimberly-Clark and Kleenex - Investing in Forest Destruction Paper giant Kimberly-Clark pays lip service to Corporate Social Responsibility

Press release, Greenpeace, May 25, 2005

Toronto, April 25, 2005 – Greenpeace today released a business report entitled Kimberly-Clark, Investing in Forest Destruction: A Report on the World´s Largest Manufacturer of Tissue Products, Green Consumerism and Socially Responsible Investment. The report highlights tissue product manufacturer Kimberly-Clark´s (KMB:NYSE) controversial use of ancient forest fibre for its disposable products and points out its false claims of environmental responsibility..

International environmental organizations have recently launched a public initiative critical of Kimberly-Clark for its role in the destruction of ancient Boreal forests in Canada. The groups, including Natural Resources Defense Council and Greenpeace, are urging Kimberly-Clark to increase the use of recycled fibre and put an end to the sourcing of fibre from ancient and endangered forests, keeping them in step with other consumer products companies who have already acted to protect forests.

“Companies that are genuinely concerned about being good corporate citizens are to be commended and supported financially. Kimberly-Clark´s continued use of Boreal forest fibre for toilet paper and facial tissue runs counter to its claims that it is an environmentally responsible company,’ said Richard Brooks, Greenpeace Forests Campaigner. “A corporate environmental policy is more than just a public relations exercise, it´s about a genuine commitment to protecting the environment in every aspect of a corporation´s activities.’

Timed to coincide with the release of Kimberly-Clark´s earnings statement today and its annual meeting later this week, the report also outlines the rise of Socially Responsible Investment (SRI) and the growing demand by consumers for ‘green´ or environmentally preferable products. Assets in socially screened investment portfolios under professional management topped the US$2 trillion mark in 2001 and continue to rise. Those companies with negative environmental standards and/or which are subject to environmental controversy are increasingly being dropped from SRI portfolios.

“Investors are increasingly looking at environmental and social outcomes when they invest because these often translate into increased profits and a clear conscience,“ added Brooks. “If you´re looking to invest in a progressive forest products company then Kimberly-Clark is not for you.’

Despite its claims of environmental concern, Kimberly-Clark continues to source virgin tree fibre from Canada´s Boreal forest, buying pulp from logging companies that engage in unsustainable clearcutting. The Boreal forest, considered the Amazon of the north, is the largest remaining North American ancient forest, representing 25 per cent of the world´s ancient forests. It is home to 40 per cent of North America´s waterfowl and provides habitat for lynx, grizzly bear, wolf and woodland caribou, a species at risk.

Companies such as Home Depot, Boise Cascade, Staples, and Office Depot have all recently made commitments to protect ancient and endangered forests.

The report is available for download at: http://www.greenpeace.ca/forest_destruction/

For more information contact:

Richard Brooks, Greenpeace Canada Forests Campaigner, cell. 416-573-7209
Andrew Male, Greenpeace Communications Coordinator, cell. 416-880-2757
High resolution photos and video b-roll are available upon request.

2b. Environmental Groups Accuse Kleenex Manufacturer of Wiping Away Canadian Forests at Annual Meeting

Press release NRDC and Greenpeace  April 28,  2005

Irving, Texas – At Kimberly-Clark´s annual meeting began  today, members of Greenpeace and the Natural Resources  Defense Council (NRDC) attended the event, calling on the  company to stop purchasing pulp from destructive logging  operations in ancient forests, especially the Canadian boreal. Greenpeace activists also held events around Irving,  highlighting the need for Kimberly-Clark, the world´s largest  producer of tissue products including the Kleenex brand, to  increase both the use of recycled and sustainably produced fiber.

“Kimberly-Clark is wiping away ancient forests by using Canadian boreal tree fiber for toilet paper and facial tissue.  It´s time for Kimberly-Clark step up and become a  responsible corporate citizen and increase ecologically sound  fiber in all their brands,’ said Richard Brooks a Greenpeace  forests campaigner, who attended the meeting.

In conjunction with the annual meeting, Greenpeace engaged shoppers and employees of Kimberly-Clark with a  15-foot “Kleercut Truck.’  The truck, which resembles a giant  Kleenex box, made stops at the company´s headquarters in Irving, TX as well as at two busy shopping areas, where  activists informed consumers, employees and shoppers  about Kimberly-Clark´s role in the destruction of ancient  boreal forests.

“Almost 40,000 concerned activists have already asked Kimberly-Clark to increase the post-consumer recycled content of its products,’ added Susan Casey-Lefkowitz, an  NRDC senior attorney who also attended the meeting. “By increasing the use of post-consumer recycled materials,  Kimberly-Clark would relieve much of the pressure to log  Canada´s boreal - our last, large North American wilderness  forest.’

Greenpeace also distributed “Kimberly-Clark: Investing in  Forest Destruction’ to investment analysts and the company´s board of directors and shareholders. The report  summarizes the rise in green consumerism, socially  responsible investments, and the potential economic  ramifications of the company´s ecologically unsound  practices.  The report also includes specific recommendations on how Kimberly-Clark can improve its  practices.

Currently, less than 19 percent of the pulp Kimberly-Clark  uses for tissue products is from recycled sources, and none  is used for Kleenex products sold in most grocery stores in  Canada and the US. Much of the pulp used is sourced from North America´s boreal forest including large areas of intact  forests in Ontario and Alberta. The boreal forest, often called  the Amazon of the North, represents 25 percent of the  world´s remaining ancient forests. Thirty percent of North America´s land birds and 40 percent of its waterfowl depend  on this forest and its wetlands.

To read the report visit:
http://www.kleercut.net/pdfs/Kimberly-Clark_Investing.pdf

B-roll and high resolutions photos of boreal forests and  clearcuts are available.

CONTACT:
Richard Brooks, Greenpeace (416) 573-7209  (cell)
Susan Casey-Lefkowitz, NRDC (202)289-2366

Kimberly-Clark and Kleenex are wiping away ancient forests.
Find out more: www.kleercut.net

3. Shareholder Activists Protest Unsustainable Logging By Weyerhaeuser
Press release, Rainforest Action Network, April 21, 2005

SEATTLE, WA — - Activists, customers and investors will today join forces to demand that Weyerhaeuser (NYSE: WY, TSX: WYL), the world´s largest lumber company, end over a century of unsustainable logging. Simultaneous demonstrations at the New York Stock Exchange, Toronto Stock Exchange and Weyerhaeuser´s annual general meeting of shareholders in Federal Way, WA will call on the company to "wake up," modernize its outdated environmental policies–originally developed in 1971–and publicly commit to protect endangered forests and respect native land rights.

Consistent with Weyerhaeuser's unilateral corporate culture, shareholders were told earlier this week that they would be prohibited from speaking at their annual meeting but would instead be provided with "comment cards" and allowed to submit their concerns in writing. In response, shareholders with over $400,000 in Weyerhaeuser stock and other stakeholders plan to hold a press conference today immediately following the AGM at the entrance to the company´s Federal Way headquarters. Speakers will raise concerns about Weyerhaeuser´s "cut & run" reputation of ignoring industry best practices and subverting laws meant to protect the environment, communities and workers.

"Wake Up Weyerhaeuser," a corporate reform campaign led by San Francisco-based Rainforest Action Network, has also launched BuyGoodWood.com, a web site to link Weyerhaeuser customers with sustainable resources like the Forest Stewardship Council, Co-op America and the U.S. Green Building Council. The site also includes a list of hundreds of leading companies with forest protection policies including Bank of America, Burger King, Citigroup, FedEx Kinko´s, Home Depot, Centex Homes and KB Home among others. BuyGoodWood.com will begin publishing one "Clear-cut Case Study" per month until Weyerhaeuser agrees to join forest products companies like Tembec and Domtar, Inc. in working with environmental groups, impacted communities and independent scientists to implement comprehensive policies to protect endangered forests and their inhabitants.

Rainforest Action Network campaigns for the forests, their inhabitants and the natural systems that sustain life by transforming the global marketplace through education, grassroots organizing and non-violent direct action. For more information, please visit www.RAN.org <http://www.RAN.org> .

Contact: Paul West, Rainforest Action Network, (415) 398-4404 x319, media [at] ran [dot] org

 4. Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society and Alberta scientists ask Klein to address the province´s environmental deficit
Press release, CPAWS Edmonton, April, 2005

Analysis of the new budget indicates the Alberta government is running an environmental deficit.  Expenditures were compared against results of the government´s recent It´s Your Future survey of Albertans.  Although Albertans ranked environment as their third priority, after health and education, government spending on the environment is extremely low.

"Whereas expenditures of most Ministries have increased in recent years, expenditures related to the stewardship of the environment have declined,’ says Rick Schneider, Executive Director of the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society, Edmonton.  Environmental groups and scientists want Klein to put more money into environmental protection including establishment of protected areas, dealing meaningfully with the decline of woodland caribou, grizzly bears and fish in the province, improving forest management, and conserving our water resources.

Although the government has committed 63% ($16.3 billion) of the budget to the two top priority areas of Alberta taxpayers, health and education, the environment as the third priority will receive less than 0.7% ($0.19 Billion).  Remarkably, the word environment is not found anywhere in the text of the government´s new fiscal plan.

In the absence of adequate stewardship, Alberta´s environment has been on a steady decline in recent years.  Alberta´s forests are the most fragmented in Canada and some ecoregions have less than 2% protection.  Already, some sensitive species such as woodland caribou are threatened with extinction. A recent report by Peter Weclaw3 at the University of Alberta estimated that caribou will be lost from Alberta within 37 years unless aggressive recovery measures are undertaken.

“Government´s own guideline for industrial use in caribou range has been violated and it is clear caribou are not doing well in Alberta,’ says Stan Boutin, professor at the University of Alberta.

Mark Boyce, professor at the University of Alberta says, “A recent modeling study done in west central Alberta indicates that without access management Alberta will lose all viable grizzly bear populations in the foothills and the only remaining bears will be those dispersing from adjacent national parks.’

“The situation for sport fish is as bad as for caribou and grizzlies, for many of the same reasons. Easy access to Alberta´s relatively few lakes and streams has accompanied development. It has resulted in widespread overexploitation of fisheries, particularly predatory species like walleye, lake trout and northern pike. Land clearing for pastures, feedlots and croplands, destruction of wetlands and streambank areas, and inadequately-controlled lakeshore development are causing deteriorating water quality in the province´s scarce surface and groundwaters,’ says Dr. David Schindler, Killam Professor of Ecology with the University of Alberta.

Contact:

Rick Schneider, Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society, Edmonton — 780-662-4233
or Helene Walsh, Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society, Edmonton — 780-922-0908

Posted May 16, 2005 by russ

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